ASD creating cashless community

ASD%27s+Dragon+cards+serve+as+students%27+identification+and+enable+tracking+of+multiple+forms+of+student+information.+This+year%2C+they+should+work+even+better+than+ever.
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ASD creating cashless community

ASD's Dragon cards serve as students' identification and enable tracking of multiple forms of student information. This year, they should work even better than ever.

ASD's Dragon cards serve as students' identification and enable tracking of multiple forms of student information. This year, they should work even better than ever.

Photographer: Fatima A-S.

ASD's Dragon cards serve as students' identification and enable tracking of multiple forms of student information. This year, they should work even better than ever.

Photographer: Fatima A-S.

Photographer: Fatima A-S.

ASD's Dragon cards serve as students' identification and enable tracking of multiple forms of student information. This year, they should work even better than ever.

Fatima A-S., Reporter

The Dragon card system was updated over the summer to help make it more efficient for ASD students and their families. This newer, more comprehensive ASD card system allows parents to better keep track of each child’s purchases as well as other student information.

According to Mr. Jeff Kersting, the head of the IT department, the old Dragon card system had many program errors and flaws that made the system inefficient and dated. He said that the school decided to use a new system based in Qatar called “Anvin,” which seemed to be a better alternative.

The original card system has been in use at ASD for five years, and it has served students from the elementary to the high school. Administrators hoped to move away from the inefficient and inconvenient need for cash, relying on online alternatives instead. Students were initially able to use Dragon cards only for cafeteria food payments, but the system was gradually expanded to allow them to pay for Booster Club and occasional fundraiser purchases the same way.

In the past year, students and parents have been encouraged or even required to make more and more payments, for yearbooks, charity donations, and even school trips, through their Dragon cards.

These changes, according to Mr. Kersting, helped the community become more effective. The use of cards in place of cash provides a level of protection against theft or loss for families. According to The Balance, a website offering business and financial tips, using online money and building cashless communities can significantly lower the risk of money being stolen. Cards also enable better record-keeping and lower the chance of mistakes. With cards and an online system, protection is higher and more secure than carrying around cash.  

The Dragon card’s design is simple. It has an embedded smart chip that is associated with each ASD student’s accounts and holds their information and money balance. 

The information from all the Dragon cards is stored in one database. When the card is tapped on the school’s scanning machines, the machine reads the information on the card and sends it to the database, which sends it back to the application. It, in turn, reads the information on the chip and enables access to the students’ personal information.

Mr. Kersting reported that while some parents have complained about minor aspects of this new system, he hopes the ASD community will eventually feel comfortable with this newest system. He said the IT department is committed to working out any remaining trouble spots, and he feels confident the latest Dragon cards will work well.